Medical technology, prescription medication use see “dramatic” rises in CDC report. ABC World News (2/17, story 8, 0:25, Sawyer) reports that “a groundbreaking health report” released on Wednesday found “a dramatic increase” in the number of prescription pills taken by Americans. According to the findings, “nearly half of all Americans take at least one prescription” medication “a day, and 21% take three or more drugs daily.” In addition, “the number of Americans taking those statin drugs to lower their cholesterol has increased almost nine times.” The CBS Evening News (2/17, story 5, 2:30, Couric) reported, “The CDC said today we’re living longer,” but “some are questioning whether we’re taking too much medicine and having too many tests for our own good.” USA Today (2/18, Marcus) reports that, according to a report by the National Center for Health Statistics, a division of the CDC, “a boom in medical technology over the past decade or two has led to a surge in certain medical tests and increased prescription drug use.” The report shows that “imaging, assisted reproductive technologies, prescription drugs, and knee replacements have all seen a dramatic rise since the early ’90s.” Data also indicated that the number of liver transplants increased “42% from 1997 to 2006.” The AP (2/18, Stobbe) reports, “The frequency of…medical scans nearly tripled at doctor offices and outpatient clinics,” while “the use of high-tech diagnostic imaging in emergency rooms has quadrupled since the mid-1990s.” But, “health officials and others worry about the safety and cost of” increased scanning. While the “surging use of improved medical technology…is driving up life expectancy for Americans and driving down rates of major killers, such as heart disease and cancer,” the report also showed that “some things about the nation’s health” have not changed, HealthDay (2/17, Reinberg) reported. In fact, the authors noted that “cigarette smoking has pretty much leveled off,” and “obesity has doubled over the past three decades.” In addition, “more Americans are going without health insurance, with almost eight percent of those aged 18 to 64 uninsured.” Modern Healthcare (2/17, Zigmond) also covered the story.

ABC World News (2/17, story 8, 0:25, Sawyer) reports that “a groundbreaking health report” released on Wednesday found “a dramatic increase” in the number of prescription pills taken by Americans. According to the findings, “nearly half of all Americans take at least one prescription” medication “a day, and 21% take three or more drugs daily.” In addition, “the number of Americans taking those statin drugs to lower their cholesterol has increased almost nine times.”

The CBS Evening News (2/17, story 5, 2:30, Couric) reported, “The CDC said today we’re living longer,” but “some are questioning whether we’re taking too much medicine and having too many tests for our own good.”

USA Today (2/18, Marcus) reports that, according to a report by the National Center for Health Statistics, a division of the CDC, “a boom in medical technology over the past decade or two has led to a surge in certain medical tests and increased prescription drug use.” The report shows that “imaging, assisted reproductive technologies, prescription drugs, and knee replacements have all seen a dramatic rise since the early ’90s.” Data also indicated that the number of liver transplants increased “42% from 1997 to 2006.”

The AP (2/18, Stobbe) reports, “The frequency of…medical scans nearly tripled at doctor offices and outpatient clinics,” while “the use of high-tech diagnostic imaging in emergency rooms has quadrupled since the mid-1990s.” But, “health officials and others worry about the safety and cost of” increased scanning.

While the “surging use of improved medical technology…is driving up life expectancy for Americans and driving down rates of major killers, such as heart disease and cancer,” the report also showed that “some things about the nation’s health” have not changed, HealthDay (2/17, Reinberg) reported. In fact, the authors noted that “cigarette smoking has pretty much leveled off,” and “obesity has doubled over the past three decades.” In addition, “more Americans are going without health insurance, with almost eight percent of those aged 18 to 64 uninsured.” Modern Healthcare (2/17, Zigmond) also covered the story.

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